how to be Nola Darling (deux)

Afro-Pessimist | Hollywood African | Male | Virgo | 24 | NYC

The Black Section in the Bookstore

“Listen up. Let me tell you something. A man ain’t a goddamn ax. Chopping, hacking, busting every goddamn minute of the day. Things get to him. Things he can’t chop down because they’re inside.” (69) Beloved, Toni Morrison

Same Gender Loving Brother (SGL)
B Boy Blues. Reformed Homothug, Militant Midget.

"Is all we good niggers here?"

The shift away from the image of white woman as sinful and sexual to that of white woman as virtuous lady occurred at the same time as mass sexual exploitation of enslaved black women-just as the rigid sexual morality of Victorian England created a society in which the extolling of woman as mother and helpmeet occurred at the same time as the formation of a mass underworld of prostitution. As American white men idealized white womanhood, they sexually assaulted and brutalized black women. Racism was by no means the sole cause of many cruel and sadistic acts of violence perpetrated by white men against enslaved black women. The deep hatred of woman that had been embedded in the white colonizer’s psyche by patriarchal ideology and anti-woman religious teachings both motivated and sanctioned white male brutality against black women. At the onset of their arrival in the American colonies, black women and men faced a society that was eager to impose upon the displaced African the identity of “sexual savage.” As white colonizers adopted a self-righteous sexual morality for themselves, they even more eagerly labeled black people sexual heathens. Since woman was designated as the originator of sexual sin, black women were naturally seen as the embodiment of female evil and sexual lust. They were labeled as jezebels and sexual temptresses and accused of leading white men away from spiritual purity into sin.

—bell hooks, “Ain’t I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism” (via bookmarrow)

(Source: boookmarrow, via cocothinkshefancy)

So African involvement has to be qualified, as it varied and secondary to that of European and American powers. Further, such involvement is clearly central to related matters such as reparations. For even if African elites were as guilty, does that excuse European and American participation? And even if African states were equally culpable, from which African governments could we expect reparations?

These are critical questions, because the logic of reparations is that compensation is to be derived from corporate bodies — states, businesses, universities, etc. — that both participated in and benefited from slavery and the slave trade. The United States, France, England, Spain, Portugal, Brazil, etc., were all present (in one form or another) during the slave trade, and they all continue to exist. They all benefited from the trade and arguably owe a great deal to those whose labor was exploited but whose persons were abused for centuries. In contrast, European colonialism did away with African sovereignty; the Dahomey and Asante of the 18th and 19th centuries are no more.

When It Comes to the Slave Trade, All Guilt Is Not Equal

A renowned historian challenges the argument by Henry Louis Gates Jr. that Africans were equally responsible for the trade in humans, therefore complicating reparations.

ripping that con Henry Louis Gates Jr. a new Hole. I approve.

(via howtobenoladarling)

(Source: theroot.com, via unccfeministunion)

So African involvement has to be qualified, as it varied and secondary to that of European and American powers. Further, such involvement is clearly central to related matters such as reparations. For even if African elites were as guilty, does that excuse European and American participation? And even if African states were equally culpable, from which African governments could we expect reparations?

These are critical questions, because the logic of reparations is that compensation is to be derived from corporate bodies — states, businesses, universities, etc. — that both participated in and benefited from slavery and the slave trade. The United States, France, England, Spain, Portugal, Brazil, etc., were all present (in one form or another) during the slave trade, and they all continue to exist. They all benefited from the trade and arguably owe a great deal to those whose labor was exploited but whose persons were abused for centuries. In contrast, European colonialism did away with African sovereignty; the Dahomey and Asante of the 18th and 19th centuries are no more.

When It Comes to the Slave Trade, All Guilt Is Not Equal

A renowned historian challenges the argument by Henry Louis Gates Jr. that Africans were equally responsible for the trade in humans, therefore complicating reparations.

ripping that con Henry Louis Gates Jr. a new Hole. I approve.

(via howtobenoladarling)

(Source: theroot.com, via kadalkavithaigal)

my18thcenturysource:

Sheet of printed music for the Ladies Lamentation for the Loss of Senesino, 1737-1738, Victoria & Albet Museum.

reblogged for the negro servant

my18thcenturysource:

Sheet of printed music for the Ladies Lamentation for the Loss of Senesino, 1737-1738, Victoria & Albet Museum.

reblogged for the negro servant

(via 18thcenturylove)

velocicrafter:

strugglingtobeheard: howtobenoladarling:
“In Slave Life in Georgia, John Brown, in his as-told-to narrative, illumines this chasm between truth and the body by elaborating the role of violence and ventriloquy in enchaining slave value. In order to penetrate the simulated revelry of the trade, he painstakingly described the New Orleans slave pen in which he was held(39):






from Scenes of Subjection by Saidiya Hartman (a rare look inside the slave pens of America)  


It’s quite eerie and scary how much those pens look like prison cells and how to a less extreme version whites expect the same of blacks especially, to smile and please them and not complain about the state of their race or people or loved ones or self. 

velocicrafter:

strugglingtobeheardhowtobenoladarling:

“In Slave Life in Georgia, John Brown, in his as-told-to narrative, illumines this chasm between truth and the body by elaborating the role of violence and ventriloquy in enchaining slave value. In order to penetrate the simulated revelry of the trade, he painstakingly described the New Orleans slave pen in which he was held(39):

from Scenes of Subjection by Saidiya Hartman (a rare look inside the slave pens of America)  

It’s quite eerie and scary how much those pens look like prison cells and how to a less extreme version whites expect the same of blacks especially, to smile and please them and not complain about the state of their race or people or loved ones or self. 

(Source: howtobeterrell, via dammitcaleb-deactivated20130328)

titam:

PASCH, le Jeune Lorentz  Portrait de la reine Sophie-Madeleine  1773-1775  Huile sur toile, 243 x 179 cm  L’Ermitage, Saint-  Pétersbourg

titam:

PASCH, le Jeune Lorentz
Portrait de la reine Sophie-Madeleine
1773-1775
Huile sur toile, 243 x 179 cm
L’Ermitage, Saint- Pétersbourg

(via 18thcenturylove)

18thcenturylove:

Portrait of Edward Wortley Montagu by William Peters, 1775

18thcenturylove:

Portrait of Edward Wortley Montagu by William Peters, 1775

sons-of-yemaya:

alookintomymind:

niquesco:

#trendsetter 

Ayisyien fyete.

François-Dominique Toussaint Louverture (b. May 20, 1743  d. April 7, 1803)
Leader of the Haitian Revolution.

sons-of-yemaya:

alookintomymind:

niquesco:

#trendsetter 

Ayisyien fyete.

François-Dominique Toussaint Louverture (b. May 20, 1743  d. April 7, 1803)

Leader of the Haitian Revolution.